Colour Me Crazy

I fancy being the person who names paint colours.

bd3eeea807eaef94dd28cc1bfa6e330aIt would encourage me to see colour everywhere. Not simply notice the distinct colours we instantly imagine with words like dandelion and rose – I’d really see colour. I’d notice shades of dandelion and how a rose alters its colours as it reveals itself to the sun. Leaves aren’t green, they’re grey-green, bright green, yellow-green, golden-brown and crimson. My black cat isn’t black but has tones of chocolate and charcoal.

I’d notice colour where I once did not.

And if I had such a profession, what would my job title be? Colour Assignment Officer? Colour Tag Coordinator? Creative Colour Consultant?

Ooh, I might call myself a COLOUR IMAGINATOR

I’ve invented a few colour names (I say ‘invented’, they might exist for all I know) but  I won’t tell you what colours they represent to me – you decide for yourself.

Pokerwork

Shoji Screen

Vintage Kitchen

Summer Dress

Chainmail

Scrabble Box

And here are a few intangible colours:

Curiousity

Déjà vu

Avast!

Mozart’s Muse

Would you like a colour more if it had the right name? Would you be swayed towards Seasalt and Driftwood beause you lived near a beach? Or is the right colour, simply right?

Our connection with colour is a wonderful thing.

And there’s this. If you haven’t seen it already, it features Ethan who discovers the joy of NOT being colour blind. [A bit of warning, he does drop the F-bomb a few times]

Looking is one thing, but seeing is magical.

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Colour Me Crazy

  1. Oooo. Great thoughts there. The name totally sways me. I painted my internal doors Gooseberry Fool.
    I think Summer Dress would be a pale blue. Chainmail would be a dull silver and Scrabblebox obviously a deep green.
    Is Pokerwork an orangey-red or a dull black?

    • We painted one of our rooms in Good Samaritan (it was a deep blue, if you’re wondering!). Summer Dress was pale yellow for me, Chainmail was spot on, Pokerwork was the orangey-red but my Scrabblebox is deep crimson! 🙂

      • I could see Summer Dress as pale yellow alright but not red for Scrabblebox. 🙂
        How did a deep blue for a room work? Was it all walls that colour or just one? What type of room? Bedroom. Sitting?
        I lived in an apartment once with a small bathroom that had huge high window so was really bright. Tiles and sanitary ware were white. But walls were a pale purple. It worked really well!

      • I love colour in a house, I’d go crazy (crazier?) in a minimalist white cube house. The bedroom isn’t especially bright and the blue is the main colour. I brought in the ‘light’ by painting the windowed-wall in an off-white called Raw Cotton. I admit, I’m not fond of pastel colours (although, I’ve seen them work really well in some spaces), most of the colours I go for are deep but not bright tones. Probably the most adventurous colour is my olive green bedroom, painted with Florida Palm.

  2. I thought the same about Pokerwork – totally orangey-red to me. Shoji Screen, for some reason, is sort of a light purple, and Vintage Kitchen a delicate blue. I love Avast! I’d totally buy a paint called Avast! and I wouldn’t even care what colour it was. Fantastic names, Kate.

    Have you heard of this lady – http://concettaantico.com/ – an artist who can, apparently, see many more colours than the normal person? She’s a tetrachromat, which *has* to be the coolest word ever. If I could develop a natural ability (short of walking on air, maybe!) I think I’d like to become a tetrachromat, too. It sounds amazing. And it would come in immensely handy if you were to work as a paint-naming technician. 🙂

    • Brilliant! Shoji Screen was off-white for me and Vintage Kitchen was spearmint green. I love how these names spark different colours! I’m off now to check out your link – maybe they’ll invent glasses that enable people to see like a tetrachromat! 😀

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